Eduproject.com.ng logo - APPROVED EDUCATION PROJECT TOPICS AND RESEARCH MATERIALS

PROJECT TOPIC: TRANSMISSION OF MONKEYPOX VIRUS ON ANIMAL AND HUMANS IN NIGERIA

Project Body:


CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND TO THE INFORMATION

Monkeypox is an infectious disease caused by the monkeypox virus. CDC. (2015) Symptoms begin with fever, headache, muscle pains, swollen lymph nodes, and feeling tired.[1] This is then followed by a rash that forms blisters and crusts over.[1] The time from exposure to onset of symptoms is around 10 days.[1] The duration of symptoms is typically 2 to 5 weeks. CDC. (2015)

Monkeypox may be spread from handling bush meat, an animal bite or scratch, body fluids, contaminated objects, or close contact with an infected person. Hutin, Williams, Malfait P (2001). The virus is believed to normally circulate among certain rodents in Africa. Diagnosis can be confirmed by testing a lesion for the viruses DNA.[3] The disease can appear similar to chickenpox.

The smallpox vaccine is believed to prevent infection. McCollum, and Damon, (2003) Cidofovir may be useful as treatment.[4] The risk of death in those infected is up to 10%.

The virus can spread both from animal to human and from human to human. Infection from animal to human can occur via an animal bite or by direct contact with an infected animal’s bodily fluids. The virus can spread from human to human by both respiratory (airborne) contact and contact with infected person’s bodily fluids. Risk factors for transmission include sharing a bed, room, or using the same utensils as an infected patient. Increased transmission risk associated with factors involving introduction of virus to the oral mucosa. Kantele A, Chickering K, Vapalahti O, Rimoin AW (2016) Incubation period is 10–14 days. Prodromal symptoms include swelling of lymph nodes, muscle pain, headache, fever, prior to the emergence of the rash. The rash is usually only present on the trunk but has the capacity to spread to the palms and soles of the feet, occurring in a centrifugal distribution. The initial macular lesions exhibit a papular, then vesicular and pustular appearance. Kantele A, Chickering K, Vapalahti O, Rimoin AW (2016).

Table of Contents

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background of the Study

1.2 Statement of the Problem

1.3 Purpose of the Study

1.4 Significance of the Study

1.5 Research Questions

1.6 Delimitations of the Study

1.7 Limitation of the study

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.0 Review of Related Literature

2.1 Concept of Monkey Pox

2.2.1 History of Ebola Virus Disease

2.2.2 Causes and Transmission Mode of Monkey Pox Virus Disease

2.2.3 Signs and Symptoms of Monkey Pox Virus Disease

2.2.4 Cases of Specific Monkey Pox Outbreak and their Description

2.2.5 Preventive Measures against Monkey Pox Virus

2.2.6 Medication and Treatment of Monkey Pox

2.2.7 Various Awareness Campaigns against Monkey Pox Virus Disease in Nigeria

2.7 Empirical Studies

2.8 Theoretical Framework

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHOD

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Area of the Study

3.3 Research Design

3.4 Population of the Study

3.5 Sample and Sampling Technique

3.6 Research Instrument

3.7 Validation of the Instrument

3.8 Data Collection Technique

3.9 Data Analysis Technique

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Data Presentation

4.3 Discussion of Findings

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

5.1 Introduction

5.1 Restatement of the Problem

5.2 Summary of Findings

5.3 Conclusion

5.4 Recommendations

5.5 Suggestions for Further Research

References

Appendix


Useful Links: