Eduproject.com.ng logo - RESEARCH PROJECT TOPICS AND PROJECT TOPICS ON EDUCATION

PROJECT TOPIC: EFFECT OF TWO DIFFERENT PERSERVATIVE ON PROCESSING FISH PRODUCTION

Project Body:


CHAPTER ONE

  • INTRODUCTION

1.1       BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY

Fish is an extremely perishable food item (Agbon et al., 2002). Soon after death, fish begins to spoil. In the healthy live fish, all the complex biochemical reactions are balanced and the fish flesh is sterile. After death however, irreversible change that results in fish spoilage begins to occur. The resultant effect is the decomposition of the fish (Akinola et al., 2006). Various factors are responsible for fish spoilage. The quality of capture is important at determining the rate of spoilage. Notably are the fish health status, the presence of parasites, bruises and wounds on the skin and the mode by which the fish was captured. The caught fish quality depends on the handling and preservation, the fish received from the hands of the fishers after capture. The handling and the preservation practice after capture affects the degree of spoilage of the fish (Akinneye et al., 2007). The quality of the freshly caught fish and its usefulness for further utilization in processing is affected by the fish capture method. Unsuitable fishing method does not only cause mechanical damage to the fish, but also creates stress and the conditions which accelerate fish deterioration after death. Fish is highly susceptible to deterioration without any preservative or processing measures (Okonta and Ekelemu, 2005). Emokpae (1979) reported that immediately the fish dies, a number of physiological and microbial deterioration set in and thereby degrade the fish. Fish is a major source of protein and its harvesting, handling, processing and distribution provide livelihood for millions of people as well as providing foreign exchange earning to many countries (Al-Jufaili and Opara, 2006).

Appropriate processing of fish enables maximal use of raw material and production of value-added products which is obviously the basis of processing profitability. Freshwater fish processing, like the processing of the other food raw materials should: assure best possible market quality, provide a proper form of semi-processed final product, assure health safety of products, apply the most appropriate processing method and reduce wastes to the barest possible extent. Akinneye et al. (2007) and Davies (2005) reported that the development of appropriate fishing machinery and techniques that employed effective production, handling, harvesting, processing and storage, cannot be over-emphasized especially in the age when aquaculture development is fast gathering momentum in Nigeria. The need to mechanize fish processing techniques has drawn the attention of national agricultural research to devote utmost interest and resources to engineering research in operation, to minimize the drudgery, reduce labour operation, and unsanitary and inherent unhygienic handling that are mostly involved in the traditional manual operations.



Useful Links: