Eduproject.com.ng logo - RESEARCH PROJECT TOPICS AND PROJECT TOPICS ON EDUCATION

PROJECT TOPIC: PHARMACOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF HIV/AIDS MANAGEMENT PHARMACY

Project Body:


CHAPTER ONE

1.0 INTRODUCTION

Ill-health can result in an increase in economic burden on individuals, contributing to income loss, asset depletion as well as investment of a large amount of National resources to combating that disease. These processes are brought into sharper focus by the social and economic impact of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic. Concern about the links between ill-health and impoverishment has placed health at the centre of development agencies‘ poverty reduction targets and strategies. This has strengthened arguments for a substantial increase in health sector investment to improve access for the world‘s poorest people to combat poverty as well as reduce disease burden (Russel, 2004). This thesis reports on an evaluation of costs committed to HIV/AIDS management in a secondary health facility, (MMSH) in Kano, Nigeria.

1.2 Statement of Research Problem

The HIV/AIDS pandemic constitutes one of the greatest health challenges of our time (IBBSS, 2008) and its impact cannot be overemphasized. HIV has added to the burden of the already over-stretched health care infrastructure in Nigeria as well as increased the number of orphans and other vulnerable children, placing additional strain on family and community support structures (FMOH, 2008).

With the growth rate (2%) and burden of illness, it is important for us to know the impact of HIV/AIDS management on health systems, individuals and societies as well as a description and analysis – a measure of the cost of illness (COI), which is a major tool in pharmacoeonomics. According to CDC (2009), COI is defined as the value of the resources that are expended or foregone as a result of a health problem. The COI includes health sector costs, the value of lost productivity by the patient (indirect cost), and the cost of pain and suffering (intangible costs) (CDC, 2009).


Useful Links: