Eduproject.com.ng logo - RESEARCH PROJECT TOPICS AND PROJECT TOPICS ON EDUCATION

PROJECT TOPIC: THE EFFECT OF COLA NITIDA AND GASINIA COLA ON RABBIT BLOOD PRESSURE

Project Body:


ABSTRACT The effect of Cola Nitida and Garsinia kola extracts on Rabbit blood pressure in 12 rabbits has been studied. A wide concentration of 10mg/ml to 500mg/ml of solutions of crude (aqueous) extracts of both Cola Nitida and Garsinia Kola was used. Infusion of the concentration range of 10mg/ml to 500mg/ml of cola nitida caused an initial dose-dependent increase in blood pressure up to the concentration of 250mg/ml then the follow up infusions of 250ml/ml and 500mg/ml caused a marked dose-dependent fall in blood pressure whereas with infusion of the same concentration of Garsinia kola caused initially no change in blood pressure up to the concentration of 80mg/ml. but starting with the infusion of 80mg/ml of extract solution up to 500mg caused a dose dependent fall in blood pressure.

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION The kola ‘’nut’’ chewed habitually by millions in Northern Nigeria, is one of 8-10, 2.5 to 5cm long, red or white fleshly seeds in a large oblong fruit produced perennially by a large tree (genus, cola: Family, sterculiacca). It is indigenous to the tropical rain forests of West Africa, West Indies, Brazil and java. Apparently some effects on chewing the odourless nut with a astringent taste has enhanced its continued use for a near 1000 years in Northern Nigeria. The habit, if not comparable certainly shows similarity to the ‘Betel’ nut chewing of Asiatic communities. It is used in social intercourse, a must in welcoming a quest, a prelude to conversation, or a concluding event to an agreement, in fact, by symbolism a language by itself, even assisting the traditional diviner to ascertain the divine acceptance of a sacrificial offering. Its role in West African society as not entirely socio-religious. The collar chocolate and the lacquer and laxatives of which it has become an important ingredient. Production in Nigeria has steadily increased since the turn of the century, rising from 7000 tons in 1930 to 1000.000 tons in 1955 (Hansen, 1964). It would be hazardous to guess how much of this is chewed in Northern Nigeria, but rapid and easy transport has ensured ready availability at low cost, and kola nut chewing has natured from an established custom to an increasing daily habit.



Useful Links:

Related Projects